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Local Heritage Survey

The Local Heritage Survey, previously known as the Municipal Inventory of Heritage Places, is a collection of places and areas within the City that have cultural and heritage significance.

The Local Heritage Survey can be viewed in the Related Documents section below.

Maylands Brickworks

A draft feasibility study for the reactivation of the Maylands Brickworks was prepared in May 2019.  However, at its Ordinary Meeting on 28 May 2019, Council resolved not to proceed with the reactivation project at that time.  The draft Maylands Brickworks Feasibility Study can be viewed here.

 

If you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact Strategic Planning by phone 9272 0649 or via email to mail@bayswater.wa.gov.au.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is heritage important?

Heritage is important in helping us understand our origins, identity and diversity, both in Western Australia as a whole and at a local level. The City of Bayswater intends to protect our significant heritage places so that current and future generations can enjoy our rich and diverse cultural heritage, together with an understanding of what came before them.

These places, particularly when coupled with artefacts, including documentary records, artworks and furniture, or with intangible heritage, such as folklore, ideas and memories, skills and practises, can enrich people’s lives by providing a sense of connection to individuals, community, landscapes, customs and practises in the past and in the present.

What is a Local Heritage Survey?

A Local Heritage Survey (LHS) is a collection of places and areas, which in the opinion of the City of Bayswater, have cultural and heritage significance.

There are a number of reasons for listing a place or area on a LHS, including:

  • Having a cultural and historical record of the City’s important places;
  • Achieving the heritage conservation objectives of town planning in the State; and
  • Providing a reference tool for Council decision-making on sites recognised as having heritage significance.

The LHS includes:

  • A collection of places that have cultural and heritage significance;
  • A collection of areas that have cultural and heritage significance; and
  • A 'Heritage List'.
'Local Heritage Survey' or 'Municipal Inventory of Heritage Places'?

A new Heritage Act 2018 was gazetted in 2018, which changed the name of 'Municipal Inventory of Heritage Places' to 'Local Heritage Survey'; however, they hold the same content and fulfil the same function.

What are Heritage Places and Heritage Areas?

A heritage place is a place that has been identified as having cultural heritage significance and is usually a standalone building, while a heritage area is a precinct that has been identified as having cultural heritage significance and a distinct character.

The LHS includes the Bayswater town centre and Maylands town centre as designated heritage areas. The Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 require that where a heritage area is to be designated, the local government must adopt a local planning policy for the area that sets out the following:

  • A map showing the boundaries of the heritage area;
  • A statement about the heritage significance of the area; and
  • A record of places of heritage significance in the heritage area.

The City is preparing a draft local planning policy that will address these matters and will also include design guidelines for new development within the heritage areas. These guidelines will cover the conservation of heritage values, guidance on the alteration and extension of existing heritage places and the development of new buildings on vacant sites.

Due to the specific legislative requirements for the designation of heritage areas, these proposals will be advertised separately for public comment at a later date.

What is a Heritage List?

The LHS includes a Heritage List, which is a list of places that will be adopted under the City's Town Planning Scheme, thereby providing them with statutory protection. The Heritage List is compiled with regard to the LHS and only places with a Management Category of 1 to 3 are included on the List.

Development approval will be required for all demolition, alterations or other development affecting the cultural heritage significance of a place or area on the Heritage List.

How is a place identified as having heritage significance?

Cultural heritage significance is assessed on the aesthetic, historic, social and scientific values of a place. The Heritage Council of WA has developed criteria to assess the heritage significance of places and these are used by the City at a local level. The City employed a specialist heritage consultant to prepare the LHS and they used these criteria to determine the significance of the included places, based on an external viewing of each place.

How does a place come to be including in the Local Heritage Survey?

Any member of the community can nominate a place or area to be included in the LHS. Alternatively the City may nominate places or areas for inclusion.

What are Management Categories?

Some places have more heritage significance than others and some buildings and structures have been lost over time, with only the site remaining. Management Categories recognise the varying degrees of significance and intactness of heritage places and provide recommendations to the City as to the level of care that should be taken for each place, if the cultural heritage values are to be retained.

CategoryLevel of SignificanceDesired Outcome

1

 

 

 

 

 

Exceptional Significance

Essential to the heritage of the locality.  Rare or outstanding example.  Recommended for inclusion on the State Register of Heritage Places.

 

 

 

The place should be retained and conserved unless there is no feasible and prudent alternative to doing otherwise. 

Any alterations or extensions should reinforce the significance of the place, and be in accordance with a Conservation Plan (if one exists for the place).

Included on the Town Planning Scheme No 24 Heritage List.

2

 

 

 

 

 

Considerable Significance

Very important to the heritage of the locality.

High degree of integrity/authenticity

 

 

 

Conservation of this place is highly desirable.

Any alterations of extensions should reinforce the significance of the place.

Included on the Town Planning Scheme No 24 Heritage List.

3

 

 

 

 

 

Some/Moderate Significance

Contributes to the heritage of the locality.  Has some altered or modified elements, not necessarily detracting from the overall significance of the item.

 

 

 

Conservation of this place is desirable.

Any alterations of extensions should reinforce the significance of the place and original fabric should be retained wherever feasible.

Included on the Town Planning Scheme No 24 Heritage List.

4

 

 

 

 

Little Significance

Contributes to the understanding of the history of the City of Bayswater.

 

 

 

Photographically record prior to major development or demolition.

Recognise and interpret the site if possible.

Do not include on the Town Planning Scheme No 24 Heritage List.

5

 

 

 

Historic Site

Historic site.  Recognise - for example, with a plaque, place name or acknowledge in new urban or architectural design.

 

 

Recognise and interpret the site if possible.

Do not include on the Town Planning Scheme No 24 Heritage List.

 

 

Can I develop a heritage place?

It may be possible to develop a heritage place, depending on the Management Category that has been assigned to it. Generally, demolition of a place within Management Categories 1 to 3 will not be supported.  However, it may be possible to alter or extend such a place, provided that the works

reinforce the significant of the place and do not significantly compromise the original fabric of the place.

More significant redevelopment of places within Management Categories 4 and 5 may be permitted; however, in some circumstances it may be necessary to make a photographic record of the place, prior to redevelopment.  It is also considered desirable to recognise and interpret these sites where possible.

It is recommended that a heritage professional is consulted on the redevelopment of any heritage place, though advice and guidance can also be obtained from the City of Bayswater's Statutory Planning Officers.

How do I know if my property is including in the Local Heritage Survey?

You can view the LHS in the related documents section below or in hard copy at the City's Libraries and the City of Bayswater Civic Centre.

Does inclusion in the LHS affect ownership?

No, a heritage listing does not affect the land ownership or access. Places remain the sole property of the owner.

Does inclusion in the LHS impact property values?

Various studies undertaken in Australia and internationally suggest that a heritage listing generally has a positive effect on property value. Like any property, the value of a heritage listed property will be affected by a range of factors, including size, location, market trends and the quality and maintenance of the property.

What do I need to take into consideration when developing a heritage listed property?

Management Category: Depending on the Management Category of the place, there may be restrictions on the type of development that can take place, whether alteration, extension, demolition, change of use etc. This will be determined based on the condition and integrity of the place and how the development would impact upon its fabric.

Local Heritage Survey: The City encourages the retention of any place of recognised heritage significance, but inclusion in the LHS will not prevent places from being developed or altered.

Heritage List: The City may grant approval for modifications or extensions to heritage listed places, where the heritage values can be retained and the development is sympathetic towards the heritage values of the place and the wider streetscape.

Will I need development approval to alter a heritage listed place?

Any alteration, extension or demolition of a place that is entered on the State Register of Heritage Places, entered on the City's Heritage List, subject to a heritage agreement or order under the Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990, or located within a heritage area, will require the development approval of the City.

Internal building work that does not materially affect the external appearance of the building does not require the development approval of the City, unless the place is entered on the State Register of Heritage Places, entered on the City's Heritage List and identified on that list as having an interior with cultural heritage significance, or is subject to a heritage agreement or order under the Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990.

Maintenance and repair using like-for-like materials is generally exempted from requiring development approval; however, due to the traditional construction techniques employed in the construction of many heritage listed places, it is recommended to seek advice from a heritage architect prior to undertaking maintenance and repairs.

Can I demolish a heritage listed property?

Where a place is entered on the Heritage List under the City's Town Planning Scheme, development approval is required for demolition of the building. Case-by-case decisions will be made in accordance with the Management Category of the place.What incentives are available for the conservation of heritage listed places?

What incentives are available for the conservation of heritage listed places?

As the City places great value on heritage places, a number of incentives and grants are available to help you restore and maintain these properties. These include:

  • Heritage grants
  • Refunding of planning and building fees
  • The flexible application of planning requirements.

Heritage grants

Heritage grants are available for residential and commercial properties where the building is more than 50 years old and the property has not received funding from the City’s Heritage fund in the previous five years.

Works eligible for a heritage grant include:

  • The painting or repainting of appropriate surfaces on the outside of the building. This does not include painting over previously unpainted exposed brickwork or other materials.
  • Appropriate restoration works, building conservation works, verandah reconstruction, repair of walls and windows, and the improvement of roof drainage.
  • Shop front restoration for commercial premises.
  • Other works approved by Council as part of an overall heritage conservation or improvement program.

Grants are limited to 50% of the total cost of the approved works, or $4,000, whichever is less. Work must be completed within 12 months of approval, unless otherwise agreed with the City.

Each property is eligible for one grant within a five-year period; and the property must not be sold or transferred within 24 months of the completion of works, unless agreed with the City.

Refunding planning and building fees

Planning and building application fees may be refunded if the building is more than 50 years old and the development enhances or maintains the heritage aspects of the building.

Flexible application of planning requirements

The City may also consider the flexible application of some planning requirements if the outcome conserves or enhances the heritage value of the place. This includes:

  • Minimum lot sizes
  • Average lot sizes
  • Plot ratio
  • Setbacks
  • Car parking
  • Landscaping

Related documents

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